Welcome, please Login or Register

Civic Life & Community Involvement

Athol October 4-6, 2016
“Social Capital Building Toolkit” by Thomas Sander and Kathleen Lowney is an October 2006 publication of the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University.  Go to http://www.hks.harvard.edu/saguaro/pdfs/skbuildingtoolkitversion1.2.pdf.

Love Caldwell is a faith-based project to develop opportunities for civic engagement, bridge building, and community service in Caldwell.  Go to www.lovecaldwell.org or call 208-459-1821.

The National Coalition for Dialogue & Deliberation (NCDD) promotes the use of dialogue, deliberation, and other innovative group processes to help people come together across differences to tackle challenging problems. An impressive variety of resources are available for download at their website.  http://ncdd.org/, 717-243-5144, info@ncdd.org.

“Governments are from Saturn……. Citizens are from Jupiter:  Strategies for Reconnecting Citizens and Government” is a publication available from the Municipal Research and Services Center.  It is full of strategies the City could use to reconnect with citizens.  Contact information for all strategies is provided.  Go to http://www.mrsc.org/publications/textsrcg.aspx.

The Heartland Center for Leadership Development is a non-profit organization based in Lincoln, Nebraska that provides information and assistance to rural communities regarding collaboration, leadership development, and strategic planning. http://www.heartlandcenter.info/publications.htm, 800-927-1115.

HomeTown Competitiveness is a joint project of the Nebraska Community Foundation, the Heartland Center for Leadership Development and the RUPIT Center for Rural Entrepreneurship. Started in 2002, HTC’s community development strategy focuses on four pillars:  (1) Developing Local Leadership, (2) Increasing Community Philanthropy, (3) Energizing Entrepreneurs, and (4) Engaging Youth.  Go to http://htccommunity.whhive.com for additional resources and contact information.

The Orton Family Foundation shares information, best practices, and tools on citizen-driven planning and public participation in rural communities.  Stewarding the Future of Our Communities:  Case Studies in Sustaining Community Engagement and Planning in America’s Small Cities and Towns is one recent publication.  Go to http://www.orton.org/resources/stewardship_study.

Idaho Nonprofit Center provides education and networking opportunities to nonprofit organizations on a variety of issues, including organizational development, fundraising, and collaboration.  Go to www.idahononprofits.org.

Idaho National Laboratory’s Community Donations.  Idaho National Laboratory (INL), on behalf of corporate funds provided by Battelle Energy Alliance, funds philanthropic projects from nonprofit agencies that focus on health and human services, disadvantaged youth, environmental projects, civic affairs, or culture and the arts.  Go to https://www.inl.gov/inl-initiatives/community-outreach/.

Karma for Cara Foundation has a microgrant program that encourages kids 18 and under to apply for funds between $250 and $1,000 to complete service projects in their communities. Whether it is turning a vacant lot into a community garden, rebuilding a school playground or helping senior citizens get their homes ready for winter, we want to hear what project you’re passionate about.  Go to http://karmaforcara.org/get-involved/apply-for-a-microgrant/.

The Idaho Commission on the Arts offers their Change Leader Institute, a three-day professional development opportunity designed for arts administrators, as well as all those working on behalf of the arts. Those who attend the Change Leader Institute go on to certify in the program by conducting an arts project in their own community. Go to http://www.arts.idaho.gov/community/leader.aspx. Contact Michelle Coleman, 208-334-2119 ext. 112, Michelle.Coleman@arts.idaho.gov.

The Northwest Community Development Institute is designed to train community development professionals and volunteers in the techniques of modern leadership and management of community development efforts. Since the program's inception, hundreds of community leaders from throughout the country have participated in the program. The Institute is offered in Boise on an annual basis. Go to https://secure.meetingsystems.com/nwcdi/. Contact Jerry Miller, Idaho Department of Commerce, 208-334-2650, jerry.miller@commerce.idaho.gov.

In Our Back Yard (IOBY) is a non-profit that helps communities accomplish small projects through crowd source funding. IOBY can help craft a crowd sourcing campaign and even serve as a group’s 501(C)3 if none exist. Go to http://www.ioby.org/.

For help creating a community foundation, contact the Idaho Community Foundation at http://www.idcomfdn.org/. Call 208-699-4249, or the Idaho Nonprofit Center at www.idahononprofits.org.

The community of Melba, ID (population 526) raised $50,000 at their 2014 community auction to support residents facing tough times. The auction has been conducted annually for over 60years and has become one of Melba’s biggest annual events. Go to http://www.idahopress.com/news/local/melba-community-auction-raisesabout/article_44bba020-a437-11e4-9ae6-df0c640623e4.html.

 

Lost Rivers (Arco and Mackay) September 23-25, 2014

To learn about INL’s Science, Technology, Engineering and Math STEM program, contact Anne Seifert, INL Education Programs 208-526-8027, anne.seifert@inl.gov.

Leadership Idaho Agriculture offers concentrated study and hands-on experiences that provide enhanced skills for future leaders in agriculture, rural communities, agribusiness and governmental agencies.  Go to http://www.leadershipidahoag.org/.  Contact Rick Waitley at 208-888-0988.

The Idaho Commission on the Arts offers their Change Leader Institute, a three-day professional development opportunity designed for arts administrators, as well as all those working on behalf of the arts.  Those who attend the Change Leader Institute go on to certify in the program by conducting an arts project in their own community.  Go to http://www.arts.idaho.gov/community/leader.aspx.  Contact Michelle Coleman, Michelle.Coleman@arts.idaho.gov, 208-334-2119, x112.

The Northwest Community Development Institute is designed to train community development professionals and volunteers in the techniques of modern leadership and management of community development efforts. Since the program's inception, hundreds of community leaders from throughout the country have participated in the program.  The Institute is offered in Boise on annual basis.  The dates for 2014 are July 21-25.  Go to https://secure.meetingsystems.com/nwcdi/.  Contact Jerry Miller, Idaho Department of Commerce, 208-334-2650, jerry.miller@commerce.idaho.gov.

The Heartland Center for Leadership Development is a non-profit organization based in Lincoln, Nebraska, that provides information and assistance to rural communities regarding collaboration, leadership development, and strategic planning. http://www.heartlandcenter.info/publications.htm, 800-927-1115.  The Center for publishes Better Schools Through Public Engagement (among many other publications related to community leadership and development).  Go to http://www.heartlandcenter.info/publications.htm.

In Our Back Yard (IOBY) is a non-profit that helps communities accomplish small projects through crowd source funding.  IOBY can help craft a crowd sourcing campaign and even serve as a group’s 501(C)3 if none exist.  Go to http://www.ioby.org/.

For helping creating a community foundation, contact the Idaho Community Foundation at http://www.idcomfdn.org/ or 208-342-3535 and/or the Idaho Nonprofit Center at www.idahononprofits.org or 208-424-2229.

Several communities are showing family-friendly movies in city parks and downtowns.  For examples, go to http://www.meridiancity.org/movienight/, http://cityoflapwai.com/, and https://www.facebook.com/pages/Idaho-Movie-Nights/182075851856660.

The on-line Community Toolbox is a service of the Work Group for Community Health and Development at the University of Kansas.  This resource offers an extensive variety of educational materials regarding community and organizational development.  Go to http://ctb.ku.edu/en.

Social Capital Building Toolkit” by Thomas Sander and Kathleen Lowney is an October 2006 publication of the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University.  Go to http://www.hks.harvard.edu/saguaro/pdfs/skbuildingtoolkitversion1.2.pdf.

Collaborative Approaches: A Handbook for Public Policy Decision-Making and Conflict Resolution”, Oregon Public Policy Dispute Resolution Center, March 2006 http://www.orconsensus.pdx.edu/documents/CollaborativeApproachesHandbook-March2006.pdf.

Love Caldwell is a faith-based project to develop opportunities for civic engagement, bridge building, and community service in Caldwell.  Go to www.lovecaldwell.org or call 208-459-1821.

Everyday Democracy (formerly Study Circles Resource Center) helps communities promote dialogue and understanding through small group dialogue.  Go to http://www.everyday-democracy.org/en/index.aspx.  Everyday Democracy also publishes ‘Changing Faces, Changing Communities’, which is intended to help communities face the challenges and meet the opportunities raised by the arrival of newcomers and involve public officials.  Go to http://www.everyday-democracy.org/en/Resource.23.aspx.

“Fostering Dialogue Across Divides:  A Nuts and Bolts Guide from the Public Conversations Project”.  This is an excellent 2006 publication available to download or purchase at http://www.publicconversations.org/node/99.

Idaho National Laboratory’s Community Giving Program funds philanthropic projects that focus on arts and culture, civic and community, and health and human services. Go to http://tinyurl.com/c3xrqpw for complete guidelines.

The National Coalition for Dialogue & Deliberation (NCDD) promotes the use of dialogue, deliberation, and other innovative group processes to help people come together across differences to tackle challenging problems. An impressive variety of resources are available for download at their website.  http://ncdd.org/, 717-243-5144, info@ncdd.org.

“Governments are from Saturn……. Citizens are from Jupiter:  Strategies for Reconnecting Citizens and Government” is a publication available from the Municipal Research and Services Center.  It is full of strategies the City could use to reconnect with citizens.  Contact information for all strategies is provided.  Go to http://www.mrsc.org/publications/textsrcg.aspx.

In addition to Facebook, communities are increasingly using on-tools to facilitate communication between residents, city officials, and community-based organizations.  These tools help inform and engage community members.  Below are few examples of such resources.  They are particularly effective ways to reach and involve younger residents.

  • WordPress—Use to create blogs.  Go to www.wordpress.org.
  • Tumblr—Another tool for creating blogs.  Go to https://www.tumblr.com/.
  • Twitter—No, it’s not just for following the latest pop culture sensation.  Communities are using them to post information about events, opportunities for public involvement, etc.  Go to www.twitter.com.
  • NextDoor – Use for creating neighborhood-based social networks.  Think of it as Facebook that only people in your neighborhood or community are part of.  Go to https://nextdoor.com/.
  • TinyLetter and MailChimp — Easy, affordable ways to send newsletters by email.  Go to www.tinyletter.com and mailchimp.com.

Every parent and grandparent knows that text messaging is another great way to reach teenagers and young adults (and, increasingly, not so young adults).  Communities school districts are starting to use them as a quick way to get information to residents and parent.  It is also being used by businesses for marketing purposes. This is called bulk or mass texting.  Some web-based text messaging tools focus on emergency notification, others are more general purpose.  Examples include:

A directory of skateparks in Idaho can be found at this website:  http://www.concretedisciples.com/skatepark-directory/skateparks/idaho_c182/.

The skatepark in Hailey, ID is a nearby example of a successful project.  Go to the park’s Facebook page:  https://www.facebook.com/HaileySkate.  Contact the City of Hailey, 208-788-4221.  Other skateparks in the area are found in Burley, Blackfoot, Fort Hall, Idaho Falls, Jerome, Sun Valley, and Ketchum.

The Tony Hawk Foundation has provided funding for the construction of skate parks in Buhl, New Meadows, and McCall.  http://www.tonyhawkfoundation.org/grant_application.asp.

Idaho State Parks and Recreation offers grants for recreation projects, particularly if they are multipurpose and attract multiple audiences.  Go to http://parksandrecreation.idaho.gov/aboutus/grants.aspx.

The Association of Idaho Cities can help identify cities with park and recreation donation programs.  Go to www.idahocities.org, 208-344-8594.

Rural Development Initiatives (RDI) is a Eugene, Oregon-based nonprofit organization that helps towns and rural partnerships develop and diversify their economies by creating inclusive, long-term strategies and identifying and managing crucial projects. They conduct community trainings on leadership, effective organizations. RDI's work is focused in Oregon but also reaches six western states (including Idaho) and British Columbia.  Go to http://www.rdiinc.org/.

The Idaho Recreational Vehicle (RV) Program is a grant program that helps public entities develop RV facilities.  Go to http://parksandrecreation.idaho.gov/idaho-recreational-vehicle-rv-program.

KaBOOM is a non-profit dedicated to the construction of parks and playgrounds.  Go to http://kaboom.org/.

Idaho Department of Parks and Recreation has grants that may be used for a variety of facilities (trails, RV parking, picnic areas etc).  Go to http://parksandrecreation.idaho.gov/about-parks-recreation#grants.  Kathy Muir, 208-514-2431, kathy.muir@idpr.idaho.gov.

Major League Baseball’s Baseball Tomorrow Fund assists communities developing playing fields and provides uniform and equipment to schools and youth baseball organizations.  Go to http://web.mlbcommunity.org/index.jsp?content=programs&program=baseball_tomorrow_fund.

The U.S. Soccer Foundation awards grants on an annual basis to support both soccer programs and field-building initiatives in underserved areas nationwide.  Go to http://www.ussoccerfoundation.org/.

The Saucony Run For Good Foundation supports programs promoting activity and healthy lifestyles for youth.  Go to http://www.sauconyrunforgood.com/.

The American Medical Association’s Healthy Living Grant Program supports grassroots health education programs to develop school and community-based solutions to behavioral health challenges.  Go to http://www.ama-assn.org/ama/pub/about-ama/ama-foundation/our-programs/public-health/healthy-living-grants.page.

The Find Youth Info website includes resources for positive youth development, which an interagency working group on youth programs define as:  “an intentional, strength-based, pro-social approach that engages youth within communities, schools, organizations, peer groups, and families in productive and constructive manner that promotes positive outcomes.”  Go to http://findyouthinfo.gov/resources/Positive-Youth-Development.

Idaho Nonprofit Center provides education and networking opportunities to nonprofit organizations on a variety of issues, including organizational development, fundraising, and collaboration.  Go to www.idahononprofits.org.

The Vermont-based Orton Family Foundation assists rural communities with visioning and long range planning projects.  They have worked with Idaho communities including Victor, ID and Blaine County.  Of note is their Heart & Soul program.  Go to http://www.orton.org/who-we-are.

The community of Melba, ID (population 526) raised $50,000 at their 2014 community auction to support residents facing tough times.  The auction has been conducted annually for over 60 years and has become one of Melba’s biggest annual events.  Go to http://www.idahopress.com/news/local/melba-community-auction-raises-about/article_44bba020-a437-11e4-9ae6-df0c640623e4.html.

Rigby June 3-5, 2014
Idaho Commission on the Arts offers grants for a variety of arts-related projects, including murals and arts education.  Go to http://www.arts.idaho.gov/.  Contact Michelle Coleman, Michelle.Coleman@arts.idaho.gov, 208-334-2119.

Idaho Humanities Council offers funding for projects that incorporate cultural heritage.  Go to www.idahohumanities.org/.

The Idaho Department of Commerce’s Idaho Gem Grant program provides funding for public infrastructure projects that support economic development.  Examples of eligible activities include: construction materials, new and rehabilitative construction, architectural and engineering services, and property acquisition.  Grant amounts are up to $50,000.  Go to http://commerce.idaho.gov/communities/community-assistance/idaho-gem-grants/.  Jerry Miller, jerry.miller@commerce.idaho.gov, 208-287-0780.

Idaho Main Street program.  Go to http://commerce.idaho.gov/community-programs/idaho-main-street-program/.  Jerry Miller, jerry.miller@commerce.idaho.gov, 208-287-0780.

Certified Local Governments (CLGs) is a program administered by the Idaho State Historical Society for the purpose of preserving the unique historic character of Idaho Communities.  CLG communities have access to technical assistance and grant funds that can be used for a variety of historic preservation projects.  Go to http://history.idaho.gov/certified-local-government-clg-program.  Contact Angie Davis, angie.davis@ishs.idaho.gov, 208-334-3847. 

National Trust for Historic Preservation’s Main Street Program.  Go to http://www.nationaltrust.org/community/resources.html and http://www.mainstreet.org/; 202-588-6219, mainstreet@nthp.org, Info@savingplaces.org.

Western Office National Trust for Historic Preservation.  Go to www.PreservationNation.org, Sheri Freemuth, AICP, Program Officer, P.O. Box 9107, Boise, ID 83707, 208-891-4121, sheri_freemuth@nthp.org.

The City of Nampa created a revolving loan fund for restoring building facades in its historic downtown.  Go to http://ci.nampa.id.us/downloads/30/FA%C3%87ADE%20IMPROVEMENT%20PROGRAM.doc.

Southern Idaho Rural Development is involved in successful business creation and downtown revitalization efforts in Shoshone and other southern Idaho communities.  Contact Julia Oxarango-Ingram, 208-309-3090, sird4u@gmail.com.

Organizing a Successful Downtown Revitalization Program Using the Main Street Approach” is a book available through the Washington Department of Trade and Economic Development.  Go to http://www.commerce.wa.gov/_cted/documents/ID_160_Publications.pdf.

RampUpIdaho is a new effort being developed by a group of folks representing transportation, business, housing, government, economic development and accessibility. The group is planning to compile a list of resources and outline a simple rationale for businesses, chambers of commerce, and other groups to begin thinking more strategically and collaboratively about access. Contact info@rampupidaho.org for more information.

Main Street:  When a Highway Runs Through It is an excellent book published in 1999 by the Oregon Department of Transportation to educate communities about pedestrian safety and community design associated with highways within city limits. http://www.contextsensitivesolutions.org/content/reading/main-street/resources/main-street-when-a-highway/.

Project for Public Spaces is a nonprofit planning, design and educational organization dedicated to helping people create and sustain public spaces that build stronger communities. Our pioneering placemaking approach helps citizens transform their public spaces into vital places that highlight local assets, spur rejuvenation and serve common needs.  Go to http://www.pps.org/.

To encourage re-use or redevelopment, many cities have completed and are maintaining a vacant building inventory.  One example is Hickory, North Carolina.  Go to http://www.hickorync.gov/eGov/apps/document/center.egov?view=item;id=4681.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture Rural Business Enterprise Grant Program can help communities plan downtown improvement projects and collectively market downtown businesses.  Go to http://www.rurdev.usda.gov/BCP_rbeg.html.  Contact Daryl Moser, daryl.moser@id.usda.gov, 208-378-5615.

Some communities have used New Markets Tax Credits to rehabilitate historic buildings, which then become the cornerstones of their downtowns.   In Idaho, New Market Tax Credits are administered by the Montana Community Development Corporation. Go to http://mtcdc.org/loans/new-markets-tax-credits/.  Contact Dave Glaser, 406-728-9234 ext  211, daveg@mtcdc.org.

The National Park Service has a historic tax credit that can be paired with New Market Tax Credit.  Go to:  http://www.nps.gov/tps/tax-incentives.htm.

The HUD Hope VI Main Street grant program provides grants to small communities to assist in the renovation of a historic or traditional central business district or “Main Street” area by replacing unused commercial space in buildings with affordable housing units. The objectives of the program are to redevelop Main Street areas, preserve historic or traditional architecture or design features in Main Street areas, enhance economic development efforts in Main Street areas, and provide affordable housing in Main Street areas. Go to http://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=235258 or contact Jerry Royster from HUD at: jerry.royster@hud.gov.

Energy Efficiency Research Institute (CEERI) based at Boise State University is a project of the Center for Advanced Energy Studies.  It provides student engineers from BSU, University of Idaho, and Idaho State University who conduct industrial assessments and full energy efficiency evaluations. Go to http://ceeri.boisestate.edu/.

Rocky Mountain Power provides energy efficiency evaluations.  Contact Tim Solomon, timothy.solomon@rockymountainpower.net, 208-359-4285.

Energy Performance Contracting is a performance-based procurement method and financial mechanism for building renewal whereby utility bill savings that result from the installation of new building systems (reducing energy use) pay for the cost of the building renewal project. A "Guaranteed Energy Savings" Performance Contract includes language that obligates the contractor, a qualified Energy Services Company (ESCO), to pay the difference if at any time the savings fall short of the guarantee.  Go to http://energyperformancecontracting.org/.

USDA’s Farmer’s Market Promotion Program (FMPP) offers grants to help improve and expand domestic farmers’ markets, roadside stands, community supported agriculture programs, agri-tourism activities, and other producer-to-consumer market opportunities.  Go to http://www.ams.usda.gov/AMSv1.0/FMPP.

For an example of an event in Michigan that builds on local food, art and heritage, go to http://www.artsandeats.org/index.html.

Learn about the City of Glenns Ferry’s downtown revitalization efforts here:  http://glennsferryidaho.org/downtown/.  Volunteer labor and financial sponsorship of individual downtown furnishings (lights, benches, etc.) by individuals, businesses, and community organizations significantly contributed to the success of this effort.

Idaho Department of Commerce – Community Development Block Grant Program can fund lighting, street trees, sidewalk, and other downtown project. Go to http://commerce.idaho.gov/communities/community-grants/community-development-block-grant-cdbg.  Contact Sharon Deal, sharon.deal@commerce.idaho.gov, 208-287-0774.

Idaho Department of Commerce’s Show Me the Money funding newsletter.  To subscribe, go to http://idaho.us2.list-manage2.com/subscribe?u=74de75b2fc7e24670e05b0def&id=a1f3c8c6b9Contact Jerry Miller at jerry.miller@commerce.idaho.gov or 208-287-0780.

Created and maintained by the Idaho Department of Commerce, Gem State Prospector is an on-line inventory of available buildings and properties in the state.  Businesses and the real estate agents looking to expand or relocate in Idaho use this website to identify potential sites.  Go to http://www.gemstateprospector.com/.  Contact Jerry Miller, jerry.miller@commerce.idaho.gov, 208-287-0780.  The Idaho Department of Commerce is offering trainings for people interested in using Gem State Prospector through the end of this year.  Contact Jenny Hemly, 208-287-3169, Jenny.hemly@commerce.idaho.gov.

Several communities are showing family-friendly movies in city parks and downtowns.  For examples, go to http://www.meridiancity.org/movienight/, http://cityoflapwai.com/, and https://www.facebook.com/pages/Idaho-Movie-Nights/182075851856660.

For an article and resources on successful efforts to fill vacant downtown storefront windows with local art, go to http://ruraltourismmarketing.com/2011/03/using-art-in-vacant-storefronts-to-rebuild-a-small-town’s-future/.

The City of Hailey has created a temporary “pop up” town square within street rights-of-way.  Go to http://thebluereview.org/pop-up-town-square-hailey-idaho/ to read an article describing the project.

In recent years the City of American Falls has completed multi-million dollar complete street project with support from agricultural producers and truckers.  Improvements include a mid-block pedestrian crossing.  Contact Jeremy Piersol, City of American Falls, 208-226-2569, or Kristen Jensen, Great Rift Business Development, 208-380-1719.

The Idaho Chapter of the American Planning Association offers an annual conference and a variety of on-line resources to help communities and their leaders plan for growth that protects traditional small town character and achieve other community goals.  Go to http://idahoapa.org/.

Dubois June 6-7, 2013

  • “Social Capital Building Toolkit” by Thomas Sander and Kathleen Lowney is an October 2006 publication of the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University.  Go to http://www.hks.harvard.edu/saguaro/pdfs/skbuildingtoolkitversion1.2.pdf.
  • “Collaborative Approaches: A Handbook for Public Policy Decision-Making and Conflict Resolution”, Oregon Public Policy Dispute Resolution Center, March 2006 http://www.orconsensus.pdx.edu/documents/CollaborativeApproachesHandbook-March2006.pdf.
  • The Center for Nonviolent Communication (NVC) is a global organization that supports the learning and sharing of NVC, and helps people peacefully and effectively resolve conflicts in personal, organizational, and political settings.  Go to http://www.cnvc.org/.
  • The Consensus Building Institute (CBI) is a Cambridge, MA- and Missoula, MT-based organization that has worked with hundreds of organizations to build consensus, resolve conflict, and produce mutually beneficial agreements. They offer training and direct consensus-building services.
  • Love Caldwell is a faith-based project to develop opportunities for civic engagement, bridge building, and community service in Caldwell.  Go to www.lovecaldwell.org or call 208-459-1821.
  • “Fostering Dialogue Across Divides:  A Nuts and Bolts Guide from the Public Conversations Project”.  This is an excellent 2006 publication available to download or purchase at http://www.publicconversations.org/node/99.
  • Idaho National Laboratory’s Community Giving Program funds philanthropic projects that focus on arts and culture, civic and community, and health and human services. Go to http://tinyurl.com/c3xrqpw for complete guidelines.
  • The National Coalition for Dialogue & Deliberation (NCDD) promotes the use of dialogue, deliberation, and other innovative group processes to help people come together across differences to tackle challenging problems. An impressive variety of resources are available for download at their website.  http://ncdd.org/, 717-243-5144, info@ncdd.org.
  • “Women talking to bridge religious divide” is an article published in the January 8, 2005 Deseret News about nine women who came together to build interfaith friendship and understanding in Utah.  Go to http://www.deseretnews.com/article/600103090/Women-talking-to-bridge-religious-divide.html?pg=all.
  • Several of resources found at the University of Idaho found Extension’s Diversity, Equity and Inclusion website.  Go to http://www.extension.org/diversity.
  • Idaho Inclusiveness Coalition is a nonprofit organization working to foster diverse and inclusive communities in Idaho.  Go to www.idahoinclues.org.
  • Center for Community and Justice, which works with Idaho communities to address education and health care issues, may be able to offer cultural awareness training to both the Hispanic and Anglo communities. http://comunidadyjusticia.org/index.html.
  • “Successful Strategies for Engaging the Latino and Hispanic Population” is a helpful article published by Michigan State University Extension.  Go to http://msue.anr.msu.edu/news/successful_strategies_for_engaging_the_latino_and_hispanic_population.
  • “Reaching and Engaging Latino Communities”, published by the California League of Cities.  Go to http://www.westerncity.com/Western-City/September-2008/Reaching-and-Engaging-Latino-Communities/.
  • Partners for Prosperity has over 10 years of experience in community development throughout eastern Idaho and now other parts of Idaho as well. Go to http://www.p4peid.org/.  Jessica Sotelo, Executive Director, 208-785-0059, jessicas@p4peid.org.
  • DiversityWorks! is a consulting firm specializing in organizational development and cross cultural understanding.  Sam Byrd, President, 208-871-2711, sbyrd2@cableone.net.
  • Idaho Commission on Hispanic Affairs.  Go to http://icha.idaho.gov/, 208-334-3776.
  • Idaho Human Rights Education Center can provide materials and assistance to help foster respect and appreciation for diversity.  Go to http://idaho-humanrights.org/.  Dan Prinzing, Executive Director, 208-345-0304.
  • Examples of successful Latino-led and focused events in eastern Idaho include the annual Cinco de Mayo Celebration in Idaho Falls (organized by that city’s Diversity Council) and the Latino Food Fair (organized by local Catholic Church members).
  • Meadows Valley Exchange is a free on-line resource created by the people of New Meadows, ID and surrounding area devoted exclusively to connecting people with those who can fulfill their needs.  It’s used to communicate information about employment, housing, things to trade/buy/sell, volunteer opportunities, and community events.  Go to http://mvexchange.org/.
  • The National Service Learning Clearinghouse has a fact sheet entitled “Beyond Needs Assessments: Identifying a Community’s Resources and Hopes” that describes an effective approach for create positive community change.  Go to http://www.servicelearning.org/instant_info/fact_sheets/cb_facts/beyond_needs_assess.
  • There are many community-based planning programs that have helped rural towns heal divides, develop and implement effective strategies for positive change.  One that has been successful (including in Victor, Idaho!) is the Orton Family Foundation’s program, “Heart & Soul.”  The handbook for the program, as well as implementation guides, can be downloaded here: http://www.orton.org/resources/heart_soul_handbook.
  • The Idaho Community Foundation has training, resources, and a financial incentives program to help communities establish a Community Foundation under their umbrella.  Go to http://www.idcomfdn.org/, 208-342-3535.
  • The Challis Messenger in Challis, ID is one small town newspaper that might serve as a model for Dubois and Clark County.  Go to http://www.challismessenger.com/.
  • The nonprofit Greater Menan Community, Inc. publishes a monthly community newsletter that may serve as a good example for Dubois.  Appendix G includes pages 1-3 of the June 2013 issue of the newsletter.  To learn more about the Greater Menan Community, Inc., go to www.thegmcinc.org or email mymenaninfo@gmail.com.
  • “Governments are from Saturn……. Citizens are from Jupiter:  Strategies for Reconnecting Citizens and Government” is a publication available from the Municipal Research and Services Center.  It is full of strategies the City and County could use to reconnect with citizens.  Contact information for all strategies is provided.  Go to http://www.mrsc.org/publications/textsrcg.aspx.
     

Grand View February 13-14, 2013

  • Many Idaho communities have established community foundations.  Examples include Teton Valley (Driggs, Victor), Kamiah, Ashton, and Soda Springs.  New Meadows just recently went through the process of establishing a community foundation.  Go to http://www.newmeadowsidaho.us/ or call 208-347-2171 for information.
  • Love Caldwell is a faith-based project to develop opportunities for civic engagement, bridge building, and community service in Caldwell.  Go to www.lovecaldwell.org or call 208-459-1821.
  • Everyday Democracy (formerly Study Circles Resource Center) helps communities promote dialogue and understanding through small group dialogue.  Go to http://www.everyday-democracy.org/en/index.aspx.
  • “Fostering Dialogue Across Divides:  A Nuts and Bolts Guide from the Public Conversations Project.” This is an excellent 2006 publication available to download or purchase at http://www.publicconversations.org/node/99.
  • The Heartland Center for Leadership Development is a non-profit organization based in Lincoln, Nebraska that provides information and assistance to rural communities regarding collaboration, leadership development, and strategic planning. http://www.heartlandcenter.info/publications.htm, 800-927-1115.
  • Idaho National Laboratory’s Community Giving Program funds philanthropic projects that focus on arts and culture, civic and community, and health and human services. Go to http://tinyurl.com/c3xrqpw for complete guidelines.
  • Web-based visioning and community engagement tools are available to brainstorm ideas, discuss issues, and build consensus.  They allow citizens to participate in a confidential, simple on-line forum.  Examples include vBulletin, MindMixer, BangTheTable, and FreeForum.org.
  • Information about creating a community barter network can be found here, http://www.ehow.com/how_4887994_create-local-online-barter-network.html.
  • Led by a local church, a successful community barter system has been created in Brewster, MA. Here is a link to an article, http://www.wickedlocal.com/brewster/archive/x1397979015.
  • Time Bank Idaho is a Boise-based nonprofit organization that strengthens community by helping people exchange the time and talents of community individuals, families, and groups — connecting unmet needs with untapped resources in the process.  Potentially, this would be an excellent way to more fully engage part-time residents in the Grand View community.  Go to http://idaho.timebanks.org/ or call 208-860-2140.
  • Several of resources found at the University of Idaho found Extension’s Diversity, Equity and Inclusion website.  Go to http://www.extension.org/diversity.
  • Idaho Inclusiveness Coalition is a nonprofit organization working to foster diverse and inclusive communities in Idaho.  Go to www.idahoinclues.org.
  • ‘Changing Faces, Changing Communities’, a publication written by Everyday Democracy to help communities face the challenges and meet the opportunities raised by the arrival of newcomers; includes pointers on how to involve public officials, http://www.everyday-democracy.org/en/Resource.23.aspx.
  • The Center for Community and Justice, which works with communities to address education and health care issues, may be able to offer cultural awareness training to both the Hispanic and Anglo communities. http://comunidadyjusticia.org/index.html, Sam Byrd, 208-378‐1368.
  • Successful Strategies for Engaging the Latino and Hispanic Population is a helpful article published by Michigan State University Extension.  Go to http://msue.anr.msu.edu/news/successful_strategies_for_engaging_the_latino_and_hispanic_population.
  • Reaching and Engaging Latino Communities, published by the California League of Cities.  Go to http://www.westerncity.com/Western-City/September-2008/Reaching-and-Engaging-Latino-Communities/.
  • Partners for Prosperity has over 10 years of experience in community development throughout eastern Idaho and now other parts of Idaho as well. Go to http://www.p4peid.org/.  Jessica Sotelo, Executive Director, 208-785-0059, jessicas@p4peid.org.
  • Like Grand View and many other Idaho communities, American Falls has experienced and is experiencing a significant growth in the Latino population. Most recently, the City Council appointed a young Latina college student to their City Council. The City Council felt this was an important move toward integrating a young Latino population. The City of American Falls further allocated funding for a G.E.D. program for Latino residents. To date, over 100 resident immigrants have received their G.E.D., increasing access to better paying positions.  Go to http://www.cityofamericanfalls.com/.
  • In Blackfoot, the nonprofit organization Partners for Prosperity helped launch the Latino Economic and Development Center (LEAD), a nonprofit asset building organization encouraging self-sufficiency. The center has a state of the art computer center where students are learning computer technology, small business training, language acquisition, and capacity building. The project started with a $20,000.00 grant from Self Development of People (SDOP), which was used to leverage resources from social and economic justice funding partners.  LEAD can possibly connect with the Grand View community to exchange information and ideas. Go to www.idaholead.org.
  • Idaho Power offers a range of services and assistance to commercial property owners and managers.  Their ‘Easy Upgrades’ program provides incentives up to $100,000 per site, per year for qualifying energy-saving improvements to commercial or industrial buildings.  They can also provide energy audits, educational materials, group presentations or seminars, on-site meetings, energy use data that can be used to help identify conservation opportunities.  Go to http://www.idahopower.com/EnergyEfficiency/Business/Programs/EasyUpgrades/default.cfm. Troy Davies, Customer Representative, 208-642-6293, tdavies@idahopower.com.
  • The Idaho Office of Energy Resources offers low interest loans for energy efficiency and can assist businesses and property owners identify tax credits and other incentives for making buildings energy efficient. Sue Seifert, 208-332-1662, sue.seifert@oer.idaho.gov.
  • USDA’s Rural Energy for America program provides grants for energy efficiency and renewable energy projects.  The grants are for directed to private businesses (not municipalities) and can pay up to 25% of project costs.  Shannon Madsen, 208-459-0761 ext. 117, shannon.madsen@id.usda.gov.
  • Home Depot offers small grants and in kind donations like paint and tools to help clean up and fix the homes of elderly, disabled, low income and veteran home owners http://homedepotfoundation.org/page/applying-for-a-grant
  • USDA Rural Development offers grants and low interest loans to help low income property owners address maintenance needs http://www.rurdev.usda.gov/MO-fact504.html
  • The Association of Idaho Cities may have model nuisance ordinances and enforcement strategies that could be shared with Grand View http://www.idahocities.org/
  • Boise Neighborhood Housing Services (BNHS) organizes both Paint the Town and Rake the Town events.  BNHS has a long history of sharing and mentoring rural communities with similar events. http://www.nhsid.org/what-we-do/paint-the-town-boise.
  • Information about organizing a community clean-up fundraiser is found here:  http://www.fundable.org/fundraising-ideas/community-cleanup-fundraisers/.
  • Kansas State University Extension publishes a free guidebook on conducting a community clean-up/fix-up campaign.  Go to http://www.ksre.ksu.edu/bookstore/pubs/MF931.pdf.
  • Many Idaho cities have organized daylong or weeklong community clean-up events.  Rathdrum, St. Anthony, Blackfoot, Post Falls, and Shelley are just a few examples.  This list also includes two cities that might have a lot in common with Grand View -- Idaho City and Melba.  To see a slide show of a 2011 clean-up day in Idaho City, go to http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3eLLPF-pXm0.
  • Canyon County Organization on Aging, Weatherization, and Human Services program helps senior and low-income homeowners and renters weatherize their dwellings.  Go to http://www.ccoaidaho.org/.

Driggs September 11-13, 2012

  • Social Capital Building Toolkit by Thomas Sander and Kathleen Lowney is an October 2006 publication of the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University.  Go to http://www.hks.harvard.edu/saguaro/pdfs/skbuildingtoolkitversion1.2.pdf.
  • “A Positive Revolution in Change:  Appreciative Inquiry”, by David Cooperrider and Diana Whitney, Case Western Reserve University, 1999.
  • The document above and many other resources related to Appreciative Inquiry are found at the Appreciative Inquiry Commons website. http://appreciativeinquiry.case.edu/.
  • “Collaboration:  What Makes it Work”, Mattessich, et. al., Fieldstone Alliance, 2001. 800-274-6024, www.FieldstoneAlliance.org
  • “Collaborative Approaches: A Handbook for Public Policy Decision-Making and Conflict Resolution”, Oregon Public Policy Dispute Resolution Center, March 2006 http://www.orconsensus.pdx.edu/documents/CollaborativeApproachesHandbook-March2006.pdf.
  • Idaho Nonprofit Center, 208-424-2229, http://www.idahononprofits.org/.
  • Northwest Institute for Dispute Resolution, University of Idaho School of Law, 208.885.4977, uilaw@uidaho.edu, http://www.law.uidaho.edu/default.aspx?pid=66197.
  • The Center for Nonviolent Communication (NVC) is a global organization that supports the learning and sharing of NVC, and helps people peacefully and effectively resolve conflicts in personal, organizational, and political settings.  Go to http://www.cnvc.org/.
  • The Consensus Building Institute (CBI) is a Cambridge, MA- and Missoula, MT-based organization that has worked with hundreds of organizations to build consensus, resolve conflict, and produce mutually beneficial agreements. They offer training and direct consensus-building services. Their new on-line course on resolving land use disputes is found here:  http://www.cbuilding.org/2007/08/28/consensus-building-institute-presents-online-course/.
  • Love Caldwell is a faith-based project to develop opportunities for civic engagement, bridge building, and community service in Caldwell.  Go to www.lovecaldwell.org or call 208-459-1821.
  • Everyday Democracy (formerly Study Circles Resource Center) helps communities promote dialogue and understanding through small group dialogue.  Go to http://www.everyday-democracy.org/en/index.aspx.
  • “The World Café:  Shaping Our Futures Through Conversations That Matter”, by Juanita Brown with David Issacs, Berrett-Koehler Publishers, 2005. This book outlines an innovative approach to discovering collective wisdom through open civic dialogue. www.theworldcafe.com.
  • “Fostering Dialogue Across Divides:  A Nuts and Bolts Guide from the Public Conversations Project.” This is an excellent 2006 publication available to download or purchase at http://www.publicconversations.org/node/99.
  • The Heartland Center for Leadership Development is a non-profit organization based in Lincoln, Nebraska that provides information and assistance to rural communities regarding collaboration, leadership development, and strategic planning. http://www.heartlandcenter.info/publications.htm, 800-927-1115.
  • Idaho National Laboratory’s Community Giving Program funds philanthropic projects that focus on arts and culture, civic and community, and health and human services. Go to http://tinyurl.com/c3xrqpw for complete guidelines.
  • Web-based visioning and community engagement tools are available to brainstorm ideas, discuss issues, and build consensus.  They allow citizens to participate in a confidential, simple on-line forum.  Examples include vBulletin, MindMixer, BangTheTable, and FreeForum.org.
  • The Pennsylvania-based National Coalition for Dialogue & Deliberation (NCDD) promotes the use of dialogue, deliberation, and other innovative group processes to help people come together across differences to tackle challenging problems. An impressive variety of resources are available for download at their website.  http://ncdd.org/, 717-243-5144, info@ncdd.org.
  • Successful Communities Online Toolkit Information Exchange - http://www.scotie.org is a partnership of planning and nonprofit organizations working together to build stronger, more resilient communities in the West. Information is exchanged through a database of active smart growth and resource protection plans and policies from rural, high amenity, and urban communities from across the West. These case studies highlight the efforts of western communities to preserve local identity, stimulate a healthy economy, and safeguard natural and cultural resources; and empower communities to design policies that fit the unique circumstances of western communities.
  • Association of Idaho Cities’ Youth Engagement Resources is an excellent collection of available resources to involve youth in community decision-making and strengthen youth and families.  Go to http://idahocities.org/index.   AIC is also a source of information about creating a community youth advisory council.  Mandy DeCastro, MDecastro@idahocities.org, 208.344.8594.
  • The Cities of Kimberly http://www.cityofkimberly.org/index.aspx?NID=886 and Meridian http://www.meridiancity.org/myac/ have active youth groups that could serve as a model for Driggs.
  • Challenge Day is a nonprofit organization that provides youth and their communities with experiential workshops and programs that demonstrate the possibility of connection through the celebration of diversity, truth, and full expression.  Several rural, suburban, and urban high schools in Idaho have partnered with Challenge Day.  Go to www.challengeday.org, 925.957.0234.
  • The Heartland Center for Leadership Development publishes Better Schools Through Public Engagement (among many other publications related to community leadership and development).  Go to http://www.heartlandcenter.info/publications.htm, 800.927.1115.
  • For State resources for bilingual programs under Title III, go to http://tinyurl.com/7sqsfty.
  • March 17, 2012 New York Times article about the benefits of bilingualism:  http://tinyurl.com/896mvo6.
  • This article published by the Center for Rural Affairs highlights the benefits of a culturally blended community.  Go to http://www.cfra.org/ruralmonitor/2011/10/13/look-iowas-first-majority-hispanic-town.
  • Several of resources found at the University of Idaho found Extension’s Diversity, Equity and Inclusion website.  Go to http://www.extension.org/diversity.
  • Idaho Inclusiveness Coalition is a nonprofit organization working to foster diverse and inclusive communities in Idaho.  Go to www.idahoinclues.org.
  • ‘Changing Faces, Changing Communities’, a publication written by Everyday Democracy to help communities face the challenges and meet the opportunities raised by the arrival of newcomers; includes pointers on how to involve public officials, http://www.everyday-democracy.org/en/Resource.23.aspx.
  • Center for Community and Justice, which works with communities to address education and health care issues, may be able to offer cultural awareness training to both the Hispanic and Anglo communities. http://comunidadyjusticia.org/index.html, Sam Byrd, 208-378‐1368.
  • Successful Strategies for Engaging the Latino and Hispanic Population is a helpful article published by Michigan State University Extension.  Go to http://msue.anr.msu.edu/news/successful_strategies_for_engaging_the_latino_and_hispanic_population.
  • Reaching and Engaging Latino Communities, published by the California League of Cities.  Go to http://www.westerncity.com/Western-City/September-2008/Reaching-and-Engaging-Latino-Communities/.
  • Partners for Prosperity has over 10 years of experience in community development throughout eastern Idaho and now other parts of Idaho as well. Go to http://www.p4peid.org/.  Jessica Sotelo, Executive Director, 208-785-0059, jessicas@p4peid.org.
  • Like Driggs, the community of American Falls has experienced and is experiencing a significant growth in the Latino population. Most recently, the City Council appointed a young Latina college student to their City Council. The City Council felt this was an important move toward integrating a young Latino population important to the growth of their community. The City of American Falls further allocated funding for a G.E.D. program for Latino residents. To date, over 100 resident immigrants have received their G.E.D., increasing access to better paying positions.
  • In Blackfoot, the nonprofit organization Partners for Prosperity helped launch the Latino Economic and Development Center (LEAD), a nonprofit asset building organization encouraging self-sufficiency. The center has a state of the art computer center where students are learning computer technology, small business training, language acquisition, and capacity building. The project started with a $20,000.00 grant from Self Development of People (SDOP), which was used to leverage resources from social and economic justice funding partners. Sonia Martinez at Partners for Prosperity has since joined the board of the National Association of Latino Asset Builders a national organization of Latino Asset builders (www.nalcab.org). LEAD can possibly connect with the Driggs community to exchange information and ideas. Go to www.idaholead.org.
  • Project for Public Spaces is a nonprofit planning, design, and educational organization dedicated to helping people create and sustain public places that build stronger communities.  Go to http://www.pps.org.
  • A Community Center How-to Guide written in October 2010 by Tony Tenne, Community Development Specialist for the Idaho Department of Commerce, is found in Appendix J.
  • The Great Good Place: Cafes, Coffee Shops, Bookstores, Bars, Hair Salons, and Other Hangouts at the Heart of a Community, by Ray Oldenburg. This book describes the importance of gathering (or “third”) places within communities.  Go to http://www.pps.org/info/placemakingtools/placemakers/roldenburg.

Glenns Ferry March 6-8, 2012

  • The Cities of Kimberly http://www.cityofkimberly.org/index.aspx?NID=886 and Meridian http://www.meridiancity.org/myac/ have active youth groups that could serve as a model for Glenns Ferry.
  • The Association of Idaho Cities maintains a list of resources related to youth engagement.  Go to http://www.idahocities.org/index.aspx?nid=142.
  • As noted in the economic development section of this report, the RUPRI Center for Rural Entrepreneurship offers publications and webinars on a variety of subjects related to youth development and attracting high school alumni back to the community as young adults.  Go to http://tinyurl.com/7wwbf8t for their youth-related resources.
  • Idaho Inclusiveness Coalition is a nonprofit organization working to foster diverse and inclusive communities in Idaho.  Go to www.idahoinclues.org.
  • Governments are From Saturn…. Citizens are From Jupiter:  Strategies for Reconnecting Citizens and Government is a publication by the Municipal Research and Services Center in Washington State.  Go to http://www.mrsc.org/publications/textsrcg.aspx.
  • Reframing Public Participation:  Strategies for the 21st Century published in Planning Theory and Practice, Vol. 5, No. 4, December 2004, makes the case that legally required public participation methods in the U.S. do not meet most basic goals for citizen involvement and are counterproductive, causing anger and mistrust.  Go to http://www.csus.edu/ccp/publications/reframing_public_participation_final.pdf.
  • A Positive Revolution in Change:  Appreciative Inquiry, by David Cooperrider and Diana Whitney, Case Western Reserve University, 1999. This document and many other resources related to Appreciative Inquiry are found at the Appreciative Inquiry Commons website.  Go to http://appreciativeinquiry.case.edu/.
  • Collaborative Approaches: A Handbook for Public Policy Decision-Making and Conflict Resolution, Oregon Public Policy Dispute Resolution Center, March 2006.  Go to http://www.orconsensus.pdx.edu/documents/CollaborativeApproachesHandbook-March2006.pdf.
  • Northwest Institute for Dispute Resolution, University of Idaho School of Law, http://www.law.uidaho.edu/default.aspx?pid=66197, 208-885-4977, uilaw@uidaho.edu.
  • The Consensus Building Institute (CBI) is a Cambridge, MA- and Missoula, MT-based organization that has worked with hundreds of organizations to build consensus, resolve conflict, and produce mutually beneficial agreements. They offer training and direct consensus-building services.  Go to www.cbuilding.org/.
  • Everyday Democracy (formerly Study Circles Resource Center).  Go to http://www.everyday-democracy.org/en/index.aspx.  Their publication Changing Faces, Changing Communities is a multi-session discussion guide designed to help communities face the challenges and meet the opportunities raised by the arrival of newcomers; includes pointers on how to involve public officials. For a copy, go to http://www.everyday-democracy.org/en/Resource.23.aspx.
  • “The World Café:  Shaping Our Futures Through Conversations That Matter”, by Juanita Brown with David Issacs, Berrett-Koehler Publishers, 2005. This book outlines an innovative approach to discovering collective wisdom through open civic dialogue.  Go to http://www.theworldcafe.com.
  • “Fostering Dialogue Across Divides:  A Nuts and Bolts Guide from the Public Conversations Project.” This is an excellent 2006 publication available to download or purchase at http://www.publicconversations.org/node/99.
  • The Heartland Center for Leadership Development is a non-profit organization based in Lincoln, Nebraska, that provides information and assistance to rural communities regarding collaboration, leadership development, and strategic planning. http://www.heartlandcenter.info/publications.htm, 800-927-1115.
  • Rural Development Initiatives (RDI) is a Eugene, Oregon-based nonprofit organization that helps towns and rural partnerships develop and diversify their economies by creating inclusive, long-term strategies and identifying and managing crucial projects. They conduct community trainings on leadership, effective organizations. RDI's work is focused in Oregon but also reaches six western states (including Idaho) and British Columbia. http://www.rdiinc.org/. Noelle Colby-Rotell, 208-954-9564, nrotell@rdiinc.org.
  • University of Idaho Cooperative Extension is facilitating conversation and planning activity as follow-up to the New Meadows Community Review. A similar opportunity could potentially be made available to Glenns Ferry. Lorie Higgins, 208-885-9717, higgins@uidaho.edu

New Meadows May 17-19, 2011

  • The monthly ‘Show Me the Money’ e-newsletter provides information and contacts related to funding opportunities – primarily for non-profit organizations.  Jerry Miller, Idaho Department of Commerce, 334-2650, ext. 2143, Jerry.miller@commerce.idaho.gov
  • The Idaho Nonprofit Center offers board, volunteer recruitment and retention, and networking trainings through on-site and on-line trainings. 208-424-2229, http://www.idahononprofits.org/.
  • The Idaho Chapter of the Association of Professional Fundraisers offers training workshops and may be willing to connect New Meadows with one of its members for some technical help, http://afpidaho.afpnet.org/.
  • University of New Hampshire Cooperative Extension Community Capacity Assessment Survey, http://cecf1.unh.edu/ccas/index.cfm.
  • Idaho Community Foundation, Lauren Tassos, Development Director, 208.342.3535, ltassos@idcomfdn.org.
  • Similar-sized cities with active community foundations include Kamiah (Upper Clearwater Community Foundation, Debbie Evans, 208-935-0764, kamiahgrants@msn.com), Soda Springs (Greater Soda Springs Community Development Foundation, Trent Clark 208-547-4300, trent.l.clark@monsanto.com), and Ashton (Ashton Community Foundation, 623-693-2251).
  • Center for Community Leadership for Reducing Poverty’s Leadership Institute, contact Lorie Higgins, UI Extension, 208-669-1480, higgins@uidaho.edu.
  • See additional resources found in Part III:  Building a Culture of Collaboration and Cooperation.
  • Association of Idaho Cities, www.idahocities.org, 208-344-8594.
  • “Reframing Public Participation:  Strategies for the 21st Century”, an article published in the publication Planning Theory and Practice, Vol. 5. No. 4, December 2004. It makes the case that legally required participation methods in the U.S. do not meet most basic goals for public participation, but they are also counterproductive and contributing to distrust. Here is a link to the article:  http://www.csus.edu/ccp/publications/Reframing_Public_Participation_Final.pdf.
  • “Governments are From Saturn……Citizens are from Jupiter:  Strategies for Reconnecting Citizens and Government”. This is a document published in June 1998 by the Municipal Research and Services Center in Washington State. As advertised, it is full of strategies the City could use to reconnect with citizens. Contact information for all strategies is provided.  Here is the link:  http://www.mrsc.org/Publications/srcgtxt.pdf.
  • University of Idaho’s “Future’s Game” is a scenarios-based group activity available to communities to explore how public and private sector decisions shape our economy, environment, and community well-being. http://www.cals.uidaho.edu/uicsc/futures/, 208-885-4017.
  • Leadership Plenty Institute. LeadershipPlenty® is an experiential and practical tool for training emerging leaders that builds on individual experience and adult education principles.  It is incorporated into the Horizons Program led by the University of Idaho Extension Service (http://www.extension.uidaho.edu/horizons/).  Information about Leadership Plenty is at www.pew-partnership.org.
  • Association of Idaho Cities Youth Engagement Resources is an excellent collection of available resources to involve youth in community decision-making and strengthen youth and families.  http://idahocities.org/index, 208-344-8594.
  • Contact Mandy DeCastro at the Association of Idaho Cities about creating a Mayor’s Youth Advisory Council.  208-344-8594, MDecastro@idahocities.org.
  • The Laura Moore Cunningham Foundation is a statewide funder of non-profits, with an emphasis on youth, education, and healthcare projects. Laura Bettis, Director, lmcf_idaho@msn.com.
  • City of Kimberly Mayor’s Youth Advisory Council http://www.cityofkimberly.org/index.aspx?nid=886.  Polly Hulsey, City Administrator, 208-423-4151, phulsey@cityofkimberly.org.
  • The Idaho Department of Labor maintains a list of available apprenticeship opportunities across the state at this site: http://labor.idaho.gov/dnn/idl/EducationTraining/ApprenticePrograms/tabid/2452/Default.aspx.