Welcome, please Login or Register

Infrastructure

Fairfield June 24-25, 2015
The USDA Rural Development Community Facilities (CF) Program has a limited amount of grant funds available to assist in the development of essential community facilities (including infrastructure, streets, roads, and bridges) in rural areas and towns of up to 20,000 in population. Grants are authorized on a graduated scale. Applicants located in small communities with low populations and low incomes will receive a higher percentage of grants. Grants are available to public entities such as municipalities, counties, parishes, boroughs, and special-purpose districts, as well as non-profit corporations and tribal governments.  Contact Dale Lish, dale.lish@id.usda.gov, 208-785-5840, ext. 119.

For additional Rural Funding Resources see http://ric.nal.usda.gov/Rural-Federal-Funding-Database.  Also see A Guide to Funding Resources is available here: http://www.nal.usda.gov/ric/ricpubs/fundguide.html.

The Idaho Rural Water Association circuit rider program could provide further input on questions regarding the capacity and condition of the water and wastewater systems.  Go to http://www.idahoruralwater.com/Pages/default.aspx or call 208-343-7001.

The Blue Cross Foundation Grant program funds, among other things, community walking and biking trails.  Go to http://www.bcidahofoundation.org/.

Idaho Health & Welfare Community Activity Connection Grants.  Go to http://www.healthandwelfare.idaho.gov/Health/IdahoPhysicalActivityandNutrition(IPAN)/PhysicalActivity/tabid/1970/Default.aspx and http://www.cdc.gov/obesity/downloads/UrbanDesignPolicies.pdf.

Idaho Smart Growth provides assistance to communities working to become more walkable and bikable as they grow.  Go to www.idahosmartgrowth.org.  Contact 208-333-8066.

The Idaho Department of Transportation has a website with information and links to ITD initiatives related to bicycling and walking, tips and resources for bicycling and walking in Idaho, information on how bicycle and pedestrian projects are implemented, as well as useful links to other organizations that are committed to bicycle and pedestrian mobility.  Go to

http://itd.idaho.gov/bike_ped/proposals.htm and http://itd.idaho.gov/bike_ped/FundingGuide2013.pdf.

The Transportation Research Board publishes resources related to selecting chemical treatments for unpaved roads.  Go to http://docs.trb.org/prp/14-3437.pdf.

The Local Highway Technical Assistance Council provides a variety of educational opportunities and other assistance to local jurisdictions and transportation agencies in rural Idaho.  Go to http://lhtac.org/.  Contact lhtac@lhtac.org or 208-344-0565.

Idaho Walk Bike Alliance.  Go to http://idahowalkbike.org/.  Contact Cynthia Gibson at 208-286-1628, Cynthia@idahowalkbike.org.

Idaho Smart Growth (ISG) offers a number of resources that can help the City act on many of the planning, zoning, and transportation-related recommendations in this report.  Go to www.idahosmartgrowth.org. Contact: Deanna Smith (deanna@idahosmartgrowth.org) or Elaine Clegg, (elaine@idahosmartgrowth.org) at 208-333-8066.

Horrocks Engineers has developed trail plans and related projects in other Idaho communities.  Contact Fairfield Community Review visiting team member Wendy Kirkpatrick Shrief, 208-463-4197, wendys@horrocks.com.

A partial list of Idaho cities and/or counties who have successfully built community or greenbelt-like trail systems includes:

Pocatello/Bannock County

Driggs/Teton County

Glenns Ferry

Ketchum/Hailey/Blaine County

Kootenai County/Coeur d’Alene Tribe

Lewiston

Moscow/Troy/Latah County

McCall/Valley County

Weiser/Cambridge/Washington County

Boise/Garden City/Eagle/Ada County

Star

Middleton

Twin Falls/Twin Falls County

Sandpoint/Bonner County

Soda Springs

In some cases, success has been made possible by the creation of a non-profit organization specifically formed to fund and construct a trail or trail system. The Latah Trail Foundation is one example (http://www.latahtrailfoundation.org/default.aspx?PageID=1, 208- 874-3860, latahtrail@gmail.com). Other communities have started out by forming a pedestrian and bicycle advisory committee. In nearly every example, success has required the passion, organization, and advocacy of local citizens and community groups.

The Center for Transportation Studies at the University of Minnesota publishes a Gravel Road Maintenance and Design Manual.  Go to http://www.mnltap.umn.edu/publications/videos/gravelroadmaintenance/.

For more on gravel road maintenance, contact Jason Giard at the Federal Highway Administration office in Boise.  He’s one of the operations engineers and he’s had a long career with Montana DOT, FHWA and is a real expert on alternative maintenance options.  Contact Jason Jason.giard@dot.gov or 208-334-9180(ext. 123).

For an example of a very good local advocacy group that makes recommendations to the city on Bike and Ped look at Bike Walk Nampa.  LaRita Schandorff is the lead.  bikewalknampa@gmail.com. They also have a fantastic bike/pedestrian plan that would be a good model.

The Sonoran Institute’s New Mobility West program does concept planning and technical assistance The Local Highway Technical Assistance Council can help Fairfield and Camas County identify potential funding for highway safety and other transportation projects. Contact Laila Kral at lkral@lhtac.org.

The Blue Cross/Blue Shield Foundation has provided money for planning and projects that encourage active living (e.g. biking and walking).  Contact Kendra Witt-Doyle, kwitt-doyle@bcidaho.com.

Neighborhood Housing Services sponsors programs to help the elderly and disabled with raking and painting using volunteers.  Go to http://www.nhsid.org/what-we-do/paint-the-town-boise/apply-for-paint-the-town-services and http://nwboise.org/rake-up-boise/

Idaho Power offers a number of programs to help home owners and renters reduce their energy costs.  Go to https://www.idahopower.com/EnergyEfficiency/Residential/default.cfm?tab=Residential

The Idaho Office of Energy Resources offers low interest loans to help home owners with energy efficiency improvements.  Contact Tammy Japhet, tammy.japhet@oer.idaho.gov, 208 332-1663.  Go to http://energy.idaho.gov/financialassistance/energyloans.htm.

USDA Rural Development’s Section 504 Home Repair program offers grants and low interest loans to help low income persons to improve, repair, modernize and remedy health and safety hazards. Go to http://www.rd.usda.gov/programs-services/single-family-housing-repair-loans-grants.  Contact 208-733-5380, Ext. 4.

The Idaho Water Resource board offers grants and low interest loans for projects designed to conserve water usage.  Funds may be used for both drinking and irrigation water projects. https://www.idwr.idaho.gov/waterboard/Financial%20program/financial.htm

Contact Stuart VanGreuningen, 208-287-490, stuart.vangreuningen@idwr.idaho.gov.

Preston March 3-5, 2015
The USDA Rural Development Community Facilities (CF) Program has a limited amount of grant funds available to assist in the development of essential community facilities (including infrastructure, streets, roads, and bridges) in rural areas and towns of up to 20,000 in population. Grants are authorized on a graduated scale. Applicants located in small communities with low populations and low incomes will receive a higher percentage of grants. Grants are available to public entities such as municipalities, counties, parishes, boroughs, and special-purpose districts, as well as non-profit corporations and tribal governments.  Contact Dale Lish, dale.lish@id.usda.gov, 208-785-5840, ext 119.

For additional Rural Funding Resources see http://ric.nal.usda.gov/Rural-Federal-Funding-Database.  Also see A Guide to Funding Resources is available here: http://www.nal.usda.gov/ric/ricpubs/fundguide.html.

The Idaho Rural Water Association circuit rider program could provide further input on questions regarding the capacity and condition of the water and wastewater systems.  Go to http://www.idahoruralwater.com/Pages/default.aspx or call 208-343-7001.

The Blue Cross Foundation Grant program funds, among other things, community walking and biking trails.  Go to http://www.bcidahofoundation.org/.

Idaho Health & Welfare Community Activity Connection Grants.  Go to http://www.healthandwelfare.idaho.gov/Health/IdahoPhysicalActivityandNutrition(IPAN)/PhysicalActivity/tabid/1970/Default.aspx and http://www.cdc.gov/obesity/downloads/UrbanDesignPolicies.pdf.

Idaho Smart Growth provides assistance to communities working to become more walkable and bikable as they grow.  Go to www.idahosmartgrowth.org.  Contact 208-333-8066.

Community Pathways in Idaho Falls.  Go to http://www.communitypathways.com/.  Contact Chris Daly, IFCommunityPathways@gmail.com.

Bannock Metropolitan Planning Organization.  Go to http://bmpo.org/.  Contact DaNiel Jose, Bike/Ped Coordinator.

Eastern Idaho Public Health in Idaho Falls.  Go to http://www.phd7.idaho.gov/.  Kaylene Craig, 208-522-0310.

The Idaho Department of Transportation has a website with information and links to ITD initiatives related to bicycling and walking, tips and resources for bicycling and walking in Idaho, information on how bicycle and pedestrian projects are implemented, as well as useful links to other organizations that are committed to bicycle and pedestrian mobility.
Go to http://itd.idaho.gov/bike_ped/proposals.htm and http://itd.idaho.gov/bike_ped/FundingGuide2013.pdf.

The Center for Transportation Studies at the University of Minnesota publishes a Gravel Road Maintenance and Design Manual.  Go to http://www.mnltap.umn.edu/publications/videos/gravelroadmaintenance/.

The Transportation Research Board publishes resources related to selecting chemical treatments for unpaved roads.  Go to http://docs.trb.org/prp/14-3437.pdf.

The Local Highway Technical Assistance Council provides a variety of educational opportunities and other assistance to local jurisdictions and transportation agencies in rural Idaho.  Go to http://lhtac.org/.  Contact lhtac@lhtac.org or 208-344-0565.

Idaho Walk Bike Alliance.  Go to http://idahowalkbike.org/.  Contact Cynthia Gibson at 208-286-1628, Cynthia@idahowalkbike.org.

A partial list of Idaho cities and/or counties who have successfully built community or greenbelt-like trail systems includes:

Pocatello/Bannock County

Driggs/Teton County

Glenns Ferry

Ketchum/Hailey/Blaine County

Kootenai County/Coeur d’Alene Tribe

Lewiston

Moscow/Troy/Latah County

McCall/Valley County

Weiser/Cambridge/Washington County

Boise/Garden City/Eagle/Ada County

Star

Middleton

Twin Falls/Twin Falls County

Sandpoint/Bonner County

Soda Springs

In some cases, success has been made possible by the creation of a non-profit organization specifically formed to fund and construct a trail or trail system. The Latah Trail Foundation is one example (http://www.latahtrailfoundation.org/default.aspx?PageID=1, 208- 874-3860, latahtrail@gmail.com). Other communities have started out by forming a pedestrian and bicycle advisory committee. In nearly every example, success has required the passion, organization, and advocacy of local citizens and community groups.

The Center for Transportation Studies at the University of Minnesota publishes a Gravel Road Maintenance and Design Manual.  Go to http://www.mnltap.umn.edu/publications/videos/gravelroadmaintenance/.

The Transportation Research Board publishes resources related to selecting chemical treatments for unpaved roads.  Go to http://docs.trb.org/prp/14-3437.pdf.

For more on gravel road maintenance, contact Jason Giard at the Federal Highway Administration office in Boise.  He’s one of the operations engineers and he’s had a long career with Montana DOT, FHWA and is a real expert on alternative maintenance options.  Contact Jason Jason.giard@dot.gov or 208-334-9180(ext. 123).

The Congestion Management and Air Quality (CMAQ) program provides funding for PM2.5 non-attainment areas, of which Preston is part.  Funding must be used transportation‐related projects that contribute to air quality improvements and reduce congestion.  Franklin County is the only PM 2.5 non-attainment area in the state. The state is not required to spend the CMAQ funds, but if they do, they can only use them in PM2.5 non-attainment areas.  For more information, contact Chris Peirsol, ITD Senior Transportation Planner for District 5 (208-239-3300, chris.peirsol@itd.idaho.gov) or Brian Shea, ITD headquarters in Boise (208-334-882, brian.shea@itd.idaho.gov).  Local officials should also be in contact with Dwight Horsch, ITD Board Member representing District 5.

For an example of a very good local advocacy group that makes recommendations to the city on Bike and Ped look at Bike Walk Nampa.  LaRita Schandorff is the lead.  bikewalknampa@gmail.com. They also have a fantastic bike/ped plan that would be a good model.

Chris Danley, Vitruvian Planning, has done a lot of work with communities for Safe Routes to School, Health Impact Assessments, and he recently developed a walk audit clinic for communities.  He does really hands on work to help build support for bike and pedestrian projects in small communities.  Contact him at cdanley@vitruvianplanning.com.

The Sonoran Institute’s New Mobility West program does concept planning and technical assistance type training on particular corridors. Contact Jillian Sutherland, jsutherland@sonoraninstitute.org

The Local Highway Technical Assistance Council can help Preston and Franklin identify potential funding for highway safety and other transportation projects. Contact Laila Kral at lkral@lhtac.org.

The Blue Cross/Blue Shield Foundation has provided money for planning and projects that encourage active living (e.g. biking and walking).  Contact Kendra Witt-Doyle, kwitt-doyle@bcidaho.com.

For models of good Safe Routes to School programs, look at Idaho Falls, Sandpoint, and the Treasure Valley.  For Idaho Falls, contact DaNiel Jose (DJose@bmpo.org).  For Treasure Valley contact Lisa Brady for the YMCA Safe Routes Program (Lisa.Brady@ymcatvidaho.org).

Aberdeen March 4-6, 2014
The USDA Rural Development Community Facilities (CF) Program has a limited amount of grant funds available to assist in the development of essential community facilities (including infrastructure, streets, roads, and bridges) in rural areas and towns of up to 20,000 in population. Grants are authorized on a graduated scale. Applicants located in small communities with low populations and low incomes will receive a higher percentage of grants. Grants are available to public entities such as municipalities, counties, parishes, boroughs, and special-purpose districts, as well as non-profit corporations and tribal governments.  Contact Dale Lish, dale.lish@id.usda.gov, 208-785-5840, ext 119.

For additional Rural Funding Resources see http://ric.nal.usda.gov/Rural-Federal-Funding-Database.  Also see A Guide to Funding Resources is available here: http://www.nal.usda.gov/ric/ricpubs/fundguide.html.

The Blue Cross Foundation Grant program funds, among other things, community walking and biking trails.  Go to http://www.bcidahofoundation.org/.

Idaho Health & Welfare Community Activity Connection Grants.  Go to http://www.healthandwelfare.idaho.gov/Health/IdahoPhysicalActivityandNutrition(IPAN)/PhysicalActivity/tabid/1970/Default.aspx and http://www.cdc.gov/obesity/downloads/UrbanDesignPolicies.pdf.

Idaho Parks & Recreation grants.  Go to http://parksandrecreation.idaho.gov/about-parks-recreation.

National Park Service.  Go to http://www.nps.gov/partnerships/funding_sources.htm.

USDA Forest Service grants.  Go to http://www.fs.usda.gov/main/r4/workingtogether/grants.

BLM grants.  Go to http://www.blm.gov/wo/st/en/info/About_BLM.html.

The Army Corps of Engineers is a potential grant fund resource for the sewer collection line project.   Contact the Boise Outreach Office at http://www.nww.usace.army.mil/Locations/BoiseOutreachOffice.aspx, 208-345-2065, or Boise.Office@usace.army.mil.

Sandpoint’s downtown has good examples of streets that manage storm water with vegetation.  Go to http://www.cityofsandpoint.com/DowntownStreets/Sandpoint Downtown Streets Design Guide_FINAL_December 2012.pdf.  For more information, contact Kody Van Dyke, Public Works Director for the City of Sandpoint, 208-263-3407.

Idaho Smart Growth provides assistance to communities working to become more walkable and bikable as they grow.  Go to www.idahosmartgrowth.org.  Contact 208-333-8066.

Community Pathways in Idaho Falls.  Go to http://www.communitypathways.com/.  Contact Chris Daly, IFCommunityPathways@gmail.com.

Community Transportation Association of Idaho.  Go to http://ctai.org/.  Contact Dave Dorian, Mobility Manager for District 5, ddoran@ctai.org, 208-241-4379.

Bannock Metropolitan Planning Organization.  Go to http://bmpo.org/.  Contact DaNiel Jose, Bike/Ped Coordinator.

Eastern Idaho Public Health in Idaho Falls.  Go to http://www.phd7.idaho.gov/.  Kaylene Craig, 208-522-0310.

The Idaho Department of Transportation has a website with information and links to ITD initiatives related to bicycling and walking, tips and resources for bicycling and walking in Idaho, information on how bicycle and pedestrian projects are implemented, as well as useful links to other organizations that are committed to bicycle and pedestrian mobility.  Go to

http://itd.idaho.gov/bike_ped/proposals.htm and http://itd.idaho.gov/bike_ped/FundingGuide2013.pdf.

The Center for Transportation Studies at the University of Minnesota publishes a Gravel Road Maintenance and Design Manual.  Go to http://www.mnltap.umn.edu/publications/videos/gravelroadmaintenance/.

The Transportation Research Board publishes resources related to selecting chemical treatments for unpaved roads.  Go to http://docs.trb.org/prp/14-3437.pdf.

Solicit ideas and best practices with other highway districts who have similar challenges, including, for example, Custer County Highway District and Lost River Highway District.

The Local Highway Technical Assistance Council provides a variety of educational opportunities and other assistance to local jurisdictions and transportation agencies in rural Idaho.  Go to http://lhtac.org/.  Contact lhtac@lhtac.org or 208-344-0565.

Federal Land Access Program could be used to fund Phase II of Gem Trail – Boat Dock Trail.  Go to http://www.wfl.fhwa.dot.gov/programs/flap/id/index.htm.  Contact Dave Jones at Idaho Transportation Department, 208-334-8802.

Idaho Walk Bike Alliance.  Go to http://idahowalkbike.org/.  Call 208-286-1628.

A partial list of Idaho cities and/or counties who have successfully built community or greenbelt-like trail systems includes:
Pocatello/Bannock County

Driggs/Teton County

Ketchum/Hailey/Blaine County

Kootenai County/Coeur d’Alene Tribe

Lewiston

Moscow/Troy/Latah County

McCall/Valley County

Weiser/Cambridge/Washington County

Boise/Garden City/Eagle/Ada County

Star

Middleton

Twin Falls/Twin Falls County

Soda Springs

In some cases, success has been made possible by the creation of a non-profit organization specifically formed to fund and construct a trail or trail system. The Latah Trail Foundation is one example (http://www.latahtrailfoundation.org/default.aspx?PageID=1, 208- 874-3860, latahtrail@gmail.com). Other communities have started out by forming a pedestrian and bicycle advisory committee. In nearly every example, success has required the passion, organization, and advocacy of local citizens and community groups.

A rental housing search can be done at the USDA website.  Go to http://rdmfhrentals.sc.egov.usda.gov/RDMFHRentals/select_state.jsp.

The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) offers a tool to search for affordable rental housing.  Go to http://www.hud.gov/apps/section8/step2.cfm?state=ID,Idaho.

The HUD’s public housing program was established to provide decent and safe rental housing for eligible low-income families, the elderly, and persons with disabilities. Public housing comes in all sizes and types, from scattered single-family houses to apartments for elderly families. There are approximately 1.2 million households living in public housing units, managed by some 3,300 HAs. The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) administers Federal aid to local housing agencies (HAs) that manage the housing for low-income residents at rents they can afford. HUD furnishes technical and professional assistance in planning, developing and managing these developments.  http://portal.hud.gov/hudportal/HUD?src=/states/idaho/renting

The Idaho Housing and Finance Association (IHFA) has a searchable data base for Idaho renters and landlords.  IHFA’s multifamily finance department has the lending expertise to offer affordable housing developers a full array of financing alternatives. From Low-Income Housing Tax Credits, which offer incentive to developers to build affordable rental housing, to a combination construction/permanent loan, a separate permanent loan through a consortium of banks, or subordinate financing.  Go to http://www.housingidaho.com/.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Guaranteed Rural Rental Housing Program was established to increase the supply of moderately-priced housing in rural areas; ensure that housing is affordable to low- and moderate-income rural residents whose incomes are 115 percent of area median income (AMI) or less; provide housing that is decent, safe, sanitary, and competitive in the market; and foster risk-sharing partnerships with public and private lenders.  Under the program, the Agency will provide credit enhancements to encourage private and public lenders to make new loans for affordable rental properties that meet program standards.  Go to http://www.rurdev.usda.gov/HAD-Guaranteed_Rental_Loans.html.

USDA has a Rural Repair and Rehabilitation Loan and Grant program. The program provides loans and grants to very low-income homeowners to repair, improve, or modernize their dwellings or to remove health and safety hazards. To obtain a loan, homeowner-occupants must be unable to obtain affordable credit elsewhere and must have very low incomes, defined as below 50 percent of the area median income. They must need to make repairs and improvements to make the dwelling more safe and sanitary or to remove health and safety hazards. Grants are only available to homeowners who are 62 years old or older and cannot repay a Section 504 loan. For Income and Property Eligibility please see the Eligibility Site. Loans of up to $20,000 and grants of up to $7,500 are available. Loans are for up to 20 years at 1 percent interest. A real estate mortgage and full title services are required for loans of $7,500 or more. Grants may be recaptured if the property is sold in less than 3 years. Grant funds may be used only to pay for repairs and improvements resulting in the removal of health and safety hazards. A grant/loan combination is made if the applicant can repay part of the cost.

The Southeaster Idaho Community Action Agency (SEICAA) has an Energy Assistance program. Income eligible participants apply annually for a once per year cash benefit to assist with winter heating bills. For more details, visit their Energy Assistance page at http://www.seicaa.org/energy-programs/energy-assistance.

SEICAA has a Weatherization Program that provides energy conservation services to income eligible households in southeastern Idaho. The program is available to those who qualify year round. Renters, as well as homebuyers, are eligible to apply for services. The Weatherization Program helps to increase energy efficiency by concentrating on the problems of heat loss and air filtration. Measures taken to improve energy efficiency may include repairs to broken windows, insulation, caulking and weather-stripping. In addition to the material improvements made to eligible homes, Energy Conservation Education is provided to participants.  Go to http://www.seicaa.org/energy-programs/weatherization.

The Idaho Recreational Vehicle (RV) Program is a grant program that helps public entities develop RV facilities.  Go to http://parksandrecreation.idaho.gov/idaho-recreational-vehicle-rv-program.

See Appendix F for information from Idaho Housing and Finance Association about completing a housing needs assessment and housing plan.

Contact Erik Kingston, Housing Resources Coordinator, Idaho Housing and Finance Association, (ErikK@IHFA.ORG, 208-331-4706) for additional information about assessing housing condition and needs. 

Rural Housing Guaranteed Loan.  Applicants for these loans may have an income of up to 115% of the median income for the area.  Families must be without adequate housing, but be able to afford the mortgage payments, including taxes and insurance. In addition, applicants must have reasonable credit histories.  Go to http://www.rurdev.usda.gov/HAD-Guaranteed_Housing_Loans.html.

Rural Housing Direct Loan - Section 502 loans are primarily used to help low-income individuals or households purchase homes in rural areas. Funds can be used to acquire, build (including funds to purchase and prepare sites and to provide water and sewage facilities), repair, renovate, or relocate a home.  Go to http://www.rurdev.usda.gov/HAD-Direct_Housing_Loans.html.

The Rural Repair and Rehabilitation Loan and Grant program provides loans and grants to very low-income homeowners to repair, improve, or modernize their dwellings, remove health and safety hazards, complete repairs to make the dwelling accessible for household members with disabilities.  Grants are available to dwelling owners/occupants who are 62 years of age or older.  Go to http://www.rurdev.usda.gov/HAD-RR_Loans_Grants.html.

Self-Help Housing:  The USDA Rural Development (USDA RD) and the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) combine resources to help very low- and low-income households who construct their own homes.  Eastern Idaho Community Action Partnership receives funding for the program through USDA Rural Development’s Section 502 Mutual Self-Help Housing Loan Program and HUD’s regional administrator of Self-Help Homeownership Opportunity Program (SHOP).  Go to http://www.rurdev.usda.gov/rhs/sfh/brief_selfhelpsite.htm and http://portal.hud.gov/hudportal/HUD?src=/program_offices/comm_planning/affordablehousing/programs/shop, respectively.

HOME:  The HOME Program helps to expand the supply of decent, affordable housing for low- and very low-income families by providing a formula grant to the Idaho Housing and Financing Association (IHFA). IHFA uses their HOME grants to fund housing programs that meet local needs and priorities. IHFA may use their HOME funds to help renters, new homebuyers, or existing homeowners.  Go to http://portal.hud.gov/hudportal/HUD?src=/program_offices/comm_planning/affordablehousing/programs/home/.

The Low Income Housing Tax Credits (LIHTC) Program is based on Section 42 of the Internal Revenue Code.  Its purpose is to provide the private market with an incentive to invest in affordable rental housing. Federal housing tax credits are awarded through IHFA to developers of qualified projects. Developers then sell these credits to investors to raise capital (or equity) for their projects, which reduces the debt that the developer would otherwise have to borrow. Because the debt is lower, a tax credit property can in turn offer lower, more affordable rents.  Go to http://portal.hud.gov/hudportal/HUD?src=/program_offices/comm_planning/affordablehousing/training/web/lihtc/basics.

Non-profit Housing Providers like the Eastern Idaho Community Action Partnership are adept at financing and developing affordable housing primarily through the HOME and LIHTC programs described above.  Go to http://www.eicap.org/ or call 208-522-5391.  They can also help with weatherization/energy efficiency efforts.

“Shared Equity Models Offer Sustainable Homeownership” is an on-line article that could give the community additional ideas about how to keep existing affordable housing in their community.  Shared equity homeownership offers an alternative option to renting and traditional homeownership. The term refers to an array of programs that create long-term, affordable homeownership opportunities by imposing restrictions on the resale of subsidized housing units. Typically, a nonprofit or government entity provides a subsidy to lower the purchase price of a housing unit, making it affordable to a low-income buyer. The most widely implemented subsidy retention programs include community land trusts (CLTs), deed-restricted housing programs, and limited equity housing cooperatives.  Go to http://www.huduser.org/portal/periodicals/em/fall12/highlight3.html.

Through its Community Impact Grants program, the Home Depot Foundation provides awards up to $5,000 in the form of store gift cards for the purposes of housing modifications, repairs, and weatherization work.  Special emphasis is placed on projects that benefit and/or involve veterans.  Go to http://homedepotfoundation.org/page/applying-for-a-grant.

The Federal Housing Administration offers mortgage insurance for Manufactured Homes Parks.  Go to http://portal.hud.gov/hudportal/HUD?src=/program_offices/housing/mfh/progdesc/homepark207

FHA's Streamlined 203(k) program permits homebuyers and homeowners to finance up to $35,000 into their mortgage to repair, improve, or upgrade their home.  Go to http://portal.hud.gov/hudportal/HUD?src=/program_offices/housing/sfh/203k/203kmenu.

Contact Lesley Krone (lkrone@nhsid.org, 208-258-6215), Events & Special Projects Manager at Neighborhood Housing Services, to learn about developing a Paint the Town project.

Building Trust Between the Police and the Citizens They Serve is a publication of the U.S. Department of Justice’s Community Oriented Policing Services in coordination with the International Association of Chiefs of Police.  It describes in detail a variety of strategies and best practices related to building trust between law enforcement agencies and residents.  It is a available for free download at http://www.theiacp.org/portals/0/pdfs/buildingtrust.pdf.

Community Policing Defined is also a free publication from the U.S. Department of Justice’s Community Oriented Policing Services.  To download, go to http://www.cops.usdoj.gov/pdf/vets-to-cops/e030917193-CP-Defined.pdf.

The U.S. Department of Justice’s Community Oriented Policing Services maintains a website containing resources, funding information, and training opportunities.  Go to http://www.cops.usdoj.gov/.

The Criminal Justice Program at Idaho State University might be able to assist with an evaluation and implementation of community policing strategies. Go to http://www.isu.edu/sociology/criminaljustice.shtml.  Contact Program Director Teresa Casey, PhD, at 208-282-2576 or casetere@isu.edu.

The Division of Governmental Services and Studies (DGSS) at Washington State University is a university outreach unit jointly supported by the College of Arts and Sciences and WSU Extension. It serves the applied social science research needs of various governmental agencies.  It also supports basic research and grant-related work for faculty and graduate students of the School of Politics, Philosophy, and Public Affairs, the Department of Criminal Justice and Criminology, and the Edward R. Murrow College of Communications.  The DGSS is a potential resource for recommendations related to law enforcement.  Go to http://dgss.wsu.edu/Index.html or call 509-335-3329.

Dubois June 5-6, 2013

  • Contact Erik Kingston, Housing Resources Coordinator, Idaho Housing and Finance Association, (ErikK@IHFA.ORG, 208-331-4706) for additional information about assessing housing condition and needs.
  • Rural Housing Guaranteed Loan.  Applicants for these loans may have an income of up to 115% of the median income for the area.  Families must be without adequate housing, but be able to afford the mortgage payments, including taxes and insurance. In addition, applicants must have reasonable credit histories.  Go to http://www.rurdev.usda.gov/HAD-Guaranteed_Housing_Loans.html.
  • Rural Housing Direct Loan - Section 502 loans are primarily used to help low-income individuals or households purchase homes in rural areas. Funds can be used to acquire, build (including funds to purchase and prepare sites and to provide water and sewage facilities), repair, renovate, or relocate a home.  Go to http://www.rurdev.usda.gov/HAD-Direct_Housing_Loans.html.
  • The Rural Repair and Rehabilitation Loan and Grant program provides loans and grants to very low-income homeowners to repair, improve, or modernize their dwellings, remove health and safety hazards, complete repairs to make the dwelling accessible for household members with disabilities.  Grants are available to dwelling owners/occupants who are 62 years of age or older.  Go to http://www.rurdev.usda.gov/HAD-RR_Loans_Grants.html.
  • Self-Help Housing:  The USDA Rural Development (USDA RD) and the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) combine resources to help very low- and low-income households who construct their own homes.  Eastern Idaho Community Action Partnership receives funding for the program through USDA Rural Development’s Section 502 Mutual Self-Help Housing Loan Program and HUD’s regional administrator of Self-Help Homeownership Opportunity Program (SHOP).  Go to http://www.rurdev.usda.gov/rhs/sfh/brief_selfhelpsite.htm and http://portal.hud.gov/hudportal/HUD?src=/program_offices/comm_planning/affordablehousing/programs/shop, respectively.
  • HOME:  The HOME Program helps to expand the supply of decent, affordable housing for low- and very low-income families by providing a formula grant to the Idaho Housing and Financing Association (IHFA). IHFA uses their HOME grants to fund housing programs that meet local needs and priorities. IHFA may use their HOME funds to help renters, new homebuyers, or existing homeowners.  Go to http://portal.hud.gov/hudportal/HUD?src=/program_offices/comm_planning/affordablehousing/programs/home/.
  • The Low Income Housing Tax Credits (LIHTC) Program is based on Section 42 of the Internal Revenue Code.  Its purpose is to provide the private market with an incentive to invest in affordable rental housing. Federal housing tax credits are awarded through IHFA to developers of qualified projects. Developers then sell these credits to investors to raise capital (or equity) for their projects, which reduces the debt that the developer would otherwise have to borrow. Because the debt is lower, a tax credit property can in turn offer lower, more affordable rents.  Go to http://portal.hud.gov/hudportal/HUD?src=/program_offices/comm_planning/affordablehousing/training/web/lihtc/basics.
  • Non-profit Housing Providers like the Eastern Idaho Community Action Partnership are adept at financing and developing affordable housing primarily through the HOME and LIHTC programs described above.  Go to http://www.eicap.org/ or call 208-522-5391.  They can also help with weatherization/energy efficiency efforts.
  • “Shared Equity Models Offer Sustainable Homeownership” is an on-line article that could give the community additional ideas about how to keep existing affordable housing in their community.  Shared equity homeownership offers an alternative option to renting and traditional homeownership. The term refers to an array of programs that create long-term, affordable homeownership opportunities by imposing restrictions on the resale of subsidized housing units. Typically, a nonprofit or government entity provides a subsidy to lower the purchase price of a housing unit, making it affordable to a low-income buyer. The most widely implemented subsidy retention programs include community land trusts (CLTs), deed-restricted housing programs, and limited equity housing cooperatives.  Go to http://www.huduser.org/portal/periodicals/em/fall12/highlight3.html.
  • Through its Community Impact Grants program, the Home Depot Foundation provides awards up to $5,000 in the form of store gift cards for the purposes of housing modifications, repairs, and weatherization work.  Special emphasis is placed on projects that benefit and/or involve veterans.  Go to http://homedepotfoundation.org/page/applying-for-a-grant.
  • The Federal Housing Administration offers mortgage insurance for Manufactured Homes Parks.  Go to http://portal.hud.gov/hudportal/HUD?src=/program_offices/housing/mfh/progdesc/homepark207
  • FHA's Streamlined 203(k) program permits homebuyers and homeowners to finance up to $35,000 into their mortgage to repair, improve, or upgrade their home.  Go to http://portal.hud.gov/hudportal/HUD?src=/program_offices/housing/sfh/203k/203kmenu
  • Contact Lesley Krone (lkrone@nhsid.org, 208-258-6215), Events & Special Projects Manager at Neighborhood Housing Services, to learn about developing a Paint the Town project

Glenns Ferry March 6-8, 2012
 

Silver Valley September 13-15, 2011

Weatherization Resources

Multifamily Housing Resources

Emergency and Transitional Housing resources

Bonners Ferry September 21-23, 2010

Bonners Ferry September 21-23, 2010